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20130117
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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
. that is we had a very tough election, in which fundamental issues were debated, the rights of gay and lesbian people, the right to vote because of the assault on the fundamental right to vote that took place in so many states, climate change, a continuation of our commitment to think medicare and social security and the noes thtion th inequality is not a necessary component of the economy. and we want to believe all of those issues. and i think what the president was saying, was, look, we have elections. and when you have a full debate in an election and the outcome is pretty clear cut, then it's his obligation and his right to move forward on all of those issues. >> and as we are watching the navajo nation just went by, their float, one of the things i saw today, melissa, is the whole changing of the demographics of america was reflected at the inauguration, as we look at native americans float goes by, as we heard a president for the first time refer in an inaugural address to same-sex marriage and to gay rights and talking about gender rights and he was sworn in on martin luther king's bib
before women got the right to vote. and now we just had a historic election where there are more women in congress than we have ever had before. it's really an incredible movement, and i work at emily's list, and emily's list has been working on it for 28 years to get more women on the pipeline. and we are picking it up. >> sam, it seems to me that the president was almost like an ich bin ein berliner speech. he's a man of color himself. but to embrace all of this together, i have never heard any of it -- none of this they. there was no they. it was all we, a lot of we. >> keep in mind, i thought the theme was that change can spark from the individual. in all these cases you have change being a grassroots entity, but it has to have a component of the state and government to help foster it, and the line that really stuck out to me was these truths can be self-evident, but they're not self-executing. what he made was a case for why there is an important role for the government to play to basically protect our rights but also to advance us as a society whether it's on climate change, immi
. in this conversation we have the rear picture -- rare picture of king advising johnson how he's going to get re-elected in 1968 by getting the southern blacks registered. johnson is advising king -- johnson, who detests demonstrating in the streets, as most elected officials did -- is giving king clues about how he can make those demonstrations more effective. here we go. sound, lights, camera. someone let me know whether we have it or we don't. because i'm going to keep on talking. at any rate a close working relationship became even closer as civil rights movement and people in congress tried to put an end, finally, for all time, they hoped, black citizens being denied the right to vote. the first crisis came at the edmund pet tiss bridge -- pettis bridge in selma, alabama. king's lieutenants started off on a march from the town of selma, across the bridge with the stated intent of marching to montgomery. none of them had toothpaste or backpack -- a few of them had backpacks. it was a challenge. the idea was to produce a confrontation. and it did. i'm sure all of us have seen the pictures of sherr ri
beginning for him because the first time around, he was elected based on what he promised to do. and this time around, he feels he was elected on what he has done and what he can do in the years to come. and there, you're looking, again, at the president's church. and, george, i wonder what you were thinking this morning when you woke up, about this day because it is a day that gives a president we know a chance to start again, for the country. >> everything stops. everything is new for at least a moment. and he has that clear shot to speak to the entire country. and it feels like the one day where the entire country has ears to hear what the president has to say, as well. >> and one we can show the world also listening. we can show the world that after a hard-fought election, a bruising time in congress, that we are still together in this country. and i believe we have jon karl, white house correspondent, with us. he is also there on the west side of the capitol. jon? >> reporter: diane, i'm here. the divisions, the president will be surrounded, of course, by family and friends
are not about him. >> what we're celebrating is not the election or swearing in of a president. we're doing celebrate aring each other. >> reporter: and he talked about the most significant of the weekend, he talks about his wife's haircut. >> i love her bangs. she looks good. she always looks good. >> reporter: and it won't end until late monday night when they attend three different ball. and more than a couple hours away before the ceremonies begin. president obama is only the 17 17th president to have a second inaugural. alternate the u.s. capitol, susan mcginnis, back to you. >> thank you so much. and of course cbs news will provide live coverage of today's inauguration festivities, it begins on cbs 5 and will run until 1 in the afternoon and no noon newscast today. cbs 5 will have reports from christin ayers in washington in the next half hour and during our 5 and 6:00 newscasts this evening. >>> it's 42 lovely degrees in washington right now. >> it's so cold there. >> chilly out there. chilly around the bay area. we have numbers around the 20s
. the challenge to us is to remember what we learned when we first entered this movement, that you never elect someone to make change happen for you. you elect somebody to make it a little easier for your movement to keep on making change after. and so, brothers and sisters, i implore you tonight, have a good time, party caressed well, then get right back on the battlefield tuesday morning because we took our democracy back and we ain't giving it up to nobody. thank you and god bless. fire it up. fire it up. fire it up! god bless you all. >> that was president of the naacp, benjamin jealous, speaking at the peace ball, voices of hope and resistance come here in washington, d.c. on sunday night. we will be back with more from the peace ball couldn't angela davis, sonia sanchez and others in a moment. ♪ [music break] >> sweet honey in the rock performing at the peace ball last night. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we are broadcasting from washington, d.c., bringing you special coverage of today's inauguration as hundreds of thousands gath
. maybe roosevelt and hoover an example of that. franklin roosevelt had been elected by a landslide in 1932 over president hoover who was considered to be responsible for the great depression and roosevelt was a great schmoozer. finally, they reduced to looking at the super structure of thing it was the commerce department that was being built and roosevelt said, lovely steel. that was sort of the end of the conversation. the rest of the ride they went in silence. this happens much too often, but not on a second term. >> and david gregory, about a two-mile drive. >> and you remember in the modern era, george w. bush -- the language plate is -- >> yeah, the license plate just for a second here is a story. it's a -- kind of a protest legal local license plate here in washington, d.c. taxation without representation. the president has opted to use them on all the limousines. >> and that always comes up for presidents. >> d.c. has a delegate, a nonvoting member of congress. >> george w. bush met president clinton and they got along famously. they were swapping stories and how bush raise
elected by the people is being sworn in to office. just before noon at the capitol, barack obama will take the oath for his second term as president. this is a ceremonial swearing-in because the constitution requires the president to be sworn in on january 20th, and this year the 20th fell on sunday. so the president took the official oath in private yesterday in the blue room at the white house. the oath administered by the chief justice john roberts, jr. the public swearing-in and all the pomp and circumstance that go with it were put off until today and what a day it is. the temperature right now is in the high 30s. the sky is clear, a brilliant winter's day in the nation's capital. people are pouring into the national mall to witness a day of history. the first family began the day by attending services at st. john's church. that's right across the street from the white house. that's a long-standing tradition for presidents on inauguration day. joining me now in our cbs coverage is bob schieffer, our chief washington correspondent and anchor of ""face the nation."" bob, what
, and they're not totally in love with his first term. he just beat his rival in the election. >> people have lower expectations, so i think we're going to -- he may try and raise that a little bit. this will be a lot of poetry, and the state of the union address is going to be the prose where he really lays out the agenda. >> let's bring in the auth aror the book "barack obama the story" and margaret hoover, republican consultant and cnn contributor. david, what are you expecting to hear? >> i think there's a paradox here, which is that four years ago there were huge crowds and so much ebullience of the moment. he gave such a wintry speech. today there's smaller crowds, i think he's giving a more optimistic speech. i think he feels he's in a much better place today than he was four years ago? >> cornell? >> i think we'll hear some of the things picked up from the campaign. he's got to talk about the economy, talk about the number one issue to americans, and that's jobs and expanding and growing the middle class. we're looking at a middle class that continues to shrink, and it's something tha
and medicaid fantastic. that's why he won the election, and he's repeating it again. but look at the reaction. in the middle of that speech he's negotiating with the republicans on possibly reducing medicare medicaid and possibly reducing social security. i'll judge him by his actions not on his words, even though they were great today. final one classic president obama, and what he emphasizeed throughout the campaign, for better or for worse, i like the words. let's see if he follows through on action. here he is again. >> obama: fidelity to our found founding principles requires new responses to our new challenges, preserveing individual freedom ultimately requires collective action. now more than ever we must do these things together as one nation, one people. my fellow americans we are made for this moment, and we will see so long as we seize it together. >> cenk: this moment, i hope so. i hope we can seize it together. the republicans, of course, have not always been willing to work together. that's not how president obama deals with it. that's an interesting topic one that we'll discuss
supported president obama in his re-election this year. so many hispanic americans came out for him. why do you that i happened? >> well, it's very easy. you know, obama and the democrats have the best option for the latinos. immigration reform is on the table. the dream act. so, you know, the latinos here in the united states are so powerful and their voice needs to be heard. they need to be treated as first class citizens. >> reporter: in addition to celebrities, campaign volunteers came from around the country. kelly jacobs traveled from mississippi, literally, wearing her support. how many sequins are on your dress? >> 4,000 total. >> reporter: and these are all done by hand? >> they're antique shield sequ n sequi sequins. >> reporter: a lot of work behind them and ahead if they are to help president obama deliver in the second term. but tonight, it was just time for a good party. >> it looks like a good party. brianna keilar, thank you. >> everyone talking about the jason wu dress. >> twice. >> twice in a row. all right. moving on to some other news. it is the testimony that many ameri
is the first african-american elected. he used language interesting to me. that we owe a lot to our founding documents. he referred a lot to the founding documents, not a lot to the founding documents. the founding fathers owned slaves. >> a process ever since. let's play a little bit about what he said. i think the constant looking back to the constitution was a very strong theme in his speech yesterday. let's play that. >> we hold these truths to be self-evident. that all men are creating equal. that they are endowed by their creator with certainly unalienable rights, and among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. >> and with that, he sort of launched into not an olive branch, he launched into here is the preparation for the fight ahead for the next four years. is that how you saw it? >> i saw it almost a campaign speech for 2014. we need congress, need to get this thing done, yeah. i saw it that way. and very interesting. the republicans and democrats are both in this death embrace. they each have their own constituents, throwing a lot of money at them on both sides. rep
was elected president and called and said congratulations for your pulitzer in history. i would love to talk to you about how to preserve historical materials and what you've noticed from the presidential libraries you for tin. and on that basis we have talked a good bit while he's been president to renew our acquaintance ship after a 20 year hiatus. c-span: have you had any discussions with him about his whole race initiative? >> guest: absolutely. yes, i have. c-span: what do you recommend to him? >> guest: i think this is a great thing. i personally think from the work that i've done that our racial dialogue in america, our discourse is far behind hour objective reality and where we are; that if you study this period and you see how parochial, how limited, how much violence, how on a custom a lot of white people were even meeting simply from a different denomination or a different section of the country, there's -- ads in the newspaper were divided not only by race, but by sex; "help wanted, female," and jobs were -- you know, for women, were secretaries and teachers. we left it up a whol
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)

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